Teen Sleep Habits and Lifetime Obesity

Sleep deprivation puts teens at increased risk for later obesity, researchers warn.


Sleep deprivation puts teens at increased risk for later obesity, researchers warn.

Data collected from over 10 thousand 16-year-old Americans, showed one-fifth reporting less than six hours of sleep a night. At age 21, those participants were 20 percent more likely to be obese than those who averaged over eight hours of sleep per night as teenagers. The link was clear, even when accounting for other factors such as lack of exercise and excessive television viewing.

Daytime sleepiness and fatigue trigger cravings and alter appetite, causing the sleep-deprived to make poor diet choices.

The US Center for Disease Control and Prevention recommends 9 to 10 hours of sleep a night for teens.

Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, “Teen sleeplessness piles on risk for obesity,” ScienceDaily, www.sciencedaily.com.


Taken from Last Generation, Vol. 25, No. 1. Last Generation is a vibrant 32-page soul-winning magazine published six times a year. To subscribe, call (540) 672-1996, Ext. 283.

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