Smoking: from Parents to Children

The more a parent smokes, the more their teenage son or daughter will also.


The more a parent smokes, the more their teenage son or daughter will also. While this is no surprise, a recent study explores how much of an effect this has.

According to the study, 13 percent of adolescents whose parents never smoked said they had smoked at least one cigarette. For those children whose parent was dependent on nicotine, the rate went up to 38 percent. Strikingly, daughters were especially sensitive to their mother’s smoking habits, with a risk increased four fold over those whose parent did not smoke at all. Sons were not affected differently by the habits of either parent.

Clearly, if a parent does not want their child to smoke, the best choice is to not smoke either. However, even the child of a parent who had quit had an increased risk compared to those whose parents never smoked in the first place.

If mom or dad is a smoker, their teenager is more likely to be a smoker too,” EurekAlert!, eurekalert.org, September 17, 2015.


Taken from Last Generation, Vol. 26 No. 1, “Lifelines”. Last Generation is a vibrant 32-page soul-winning magazine published six times a year. To subscribe, call (540) 672-1996, Ext. 283.

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